Historic Newton

NEWTON COMMUNITY WEEKEND - Saturday and Sunday, March 3 and 4, noon-5:00 PM
NEWTON’S REVOLUTIONARY ROOTS – Thursday, March 15, 7:00 PM
THE WARMTH OF OTHER SUNS BY ISABEL WILKERSON – Monday, March 19, 7:30 PM
HISTORIC NEWTON BOOK CLUB MEETING – Thursday, March 29, 7:30 PM

Saturday and Sunday, March 3 and 4, noon-5:00 PM
NEWTON COMMUNITY WEEKEND
Newton residents are invited to enjoy free admission to the museum.

Thursday, March 15, 7:00 PM
NEWTON’S REVOLUTIONARY ROOTS – THE 2012 NEWTON HISTORY SERIES
Newton’s Horticultural Revolution: Sowing the Seeds of Change
From settlement to the dawn of a new republic, Newton’s landscape was dramatically transformed from an economy dependent on small family agriculture to one of Boston’s most prominent horticultural communities. As field crops gave way to the latest hybrid fruit and flower introductions, Newton’s citizens were transformed from farmers to gardeners. Come explore this transformation with landscape historian Lucinda Brockway as she describes how Newton’s horticultural revolution was born. At the Newton Free Library, Homer Street, Newton. Free.

Monday, March 19, 7:30 PM
THE WARMTH OF OTHER SUNS BY ISABEL WILKERSON
Join Pulitzer Prize-winning author Isabel Wilkerson for a discussion of her book about the epic journey of African Americans from the Jim Crow South to U.S. cities in the North and West in search of a better life in the early half of the twentieth century. She interviewed more than a thousand people and gained access to new data and official records to write this definitive and vividly dramatic account of how these American journeys unfolded, altering our cities, our country, and ourselves. Co-sponsored by: the Afro-American Historical and Genealogical Society of New England, Historic Newton, Myrtle Baptist Church, Newton Free Library, and the Newton Human Rights Commission. At the Newton Free Library, Homer Street, Newton. Free.

Thursday, March 29, 7:30 PM
HISTORIC NEWTON BOOK CLUB MEETING
The club’s book selection is The Plains Across: The Overland Emigrants and the Trans-Mississippi West: 1840-60 by John Unruh Jr. A finalist for the Pulitzer Prize in history and the winner of seven awards for historical writing, The Plains Across is a thoroughly researched study of the Oregon/California Trail. Relying on contemporaneous newspaper reports, letters, personal journals and diaries, Unruh explores the reasons emigrants undertook the arduous journey and the hardships, perils, and sacrifices they endured to establish a new life in the West. In reviewing the book The Washington Post Book Review wrote: “Magisterial….Unruh has not only produced the best book yet written on the overland journey, but has also laid to rest a magnitude of popular myths…The book is so rich in anecdotes, so sparklingly written… it might have come from the pen of a best-selling popularizer.” The book club is free and open to the public. New members are always welcome. At the Newton Free Library, Homer Street, Newton. Free.

CURRENT EXHIBITIONS
NEW EXHIBITION Confronting Our Legacy: Slavery and Antislavery in the North: This new exhibition transforms the lower gallery of the museum into a three-dimensional learning center with hands-on activities and information about colonial slavery, the Underground Railroad, and some local abolitionists. It draws on fresh new research, focusing on the Jackson family that lived in the Homestead, Historic Newton’s headquarters, as well as on other abolitionists from Newton or with Newton ties. Historic Newton is fortunate to have rare artifacts, on loan from the Bostonian Society, that relate to the contentious Anthony Burns trial in Boston, an event of national significance that involved citizens of Newton. By exploring the important roles of ordinary (non-famous) abolitionists, the exhibit seeks to inspire visitors to reflect on current attitudes toward race and slavery and to use history to understand today’s issues.

Newton and the Civil War: In celebration of the sesquicentennial of the Civil War, Historic Newton will be featuring a changing exhibit showcasing Newton residents in the Civil War. Among the items on display will be prints, photographs, and Grand Army of the Republic (G.A.R.) documents.

Peeking into Newton’s Toy Chest: The values and lessons toys teach us, as shown by the Historic Newton collection. Children’s attractions include hands-on toys and a model train on an elevated track.

Mapping a New Town: 1714-1874: Maps depicting Newton’s growth over the centuries are displayed; special activities for children are also featured.

Norumbega: Romance and Recreation by the River: An exhibit on Newton’s now vanished amusement park and swing-era ballroom.

Newton Salutes! Adams Street Synagogue: Celebrating Our Centennial: Newton’s oldest synagogue is celebrating one hundred years of service to Newton’s Jewish community as an Orthodox synagogue serving a diverse congregation and the broader community. The exhibit describes the history of the congregation, illustrated by historic photographs.

The Newton History Galleries feature tools, furniture, clothing, and toys to illustrate the Newton of the past.

The Jackson Homestead and Museum is open from 11:00 AM to 5:00 PM on weekdays and 12:00 noon to 5:00 PM weekends. It is closed on Mondays.

If you need special assistance for any of these programs or exhibitions, please call 617.796.1450.